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Disc VS Disk

Forums - Discs & Movies - Disc VS Disk 

22nd June 2006 3:18  #1

Jonny "Me You" Senior Member Join Date: March 2004 Location: Canada Posts: 2,863
Disc VS Disk
Disc = optical based storage

ie)Compact Disc, Digital Video Disc


Disk = magnetic based storage

ie) Hard Disk Drive, Floppy Disk


That was just to set the record straight. Sorry, it's a pet peeve.

22nd June 2006 5:50  #2

Chris Gould Editor Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 7,112 Send a message via ICQ to Chris Gould Send a message via MSN to Chris Gould Send a message via Skype to Chris Gould
Why, who's doing it? P**ses me off no end as well. As does people writing DVD's, 1990's etc when they don't mean the possessive form.

And would e.g. have been more appropriate than i.e.? Wink

22nd June 2006 8:29  #3

Kozinski Member Join Date: June 2006 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 235
Yes, e.g. would have been more suitable than i.e.

22nd June 2006 15:07  #4

Mal Webmaster Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 1,290
This is my understanding of the reasons...

Everything was "disk" because a lot of the early PC innovations up to a point took place in America, then Philips came up with Compact Disc, and optical storage followed the "disc" style.

22nd June 2006 15:56  #5

Jonny "Me You" Senior Member Join Date: March 2004 Location: Canada Posts: 2,863
Chris wrote: Why, who's doing it? P**ses me off no end as well.

Just a few posters here and there, plus I was looking at a few press releases last week and the studios themselves got it wrong when writing up descriptions.

I just had to say something...hehehe

22nd June 2006 16:12  #6

Adrian Senior Member Join Date: September 2005 Location: United States Posts: 1,305
Disc VS Disk
Jonny "Me You" wrote: Disc = optical based storage

ie)Compact Disc, Digital Video Disc


Disk = magnetic based storage

ie) Hard Disk Drive, Floppy Disk


That was just to set the record straight. Sorry, it's a pet peeve.


May be a pet peeve, but you are actually technically wrong.  According to Webster's disk and disc are variants of each other that can be used interchangeably.  Very Happy

22nd June 2006 16:35  #7

Chris Gould Editor Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 7,112 Send a message via ICQ to Chris Gould Send a message via MSN to Chris Gould Send a message via Skype to Chris Gould
Quote: Note: the american spelling, "disk", is normal for most
computer disks whereas "compact disc", having come to
computers via the audio world, is correctly spelled with a
"c", indeed, this spelling is part of the CD standard.


That's my understanding of it and long may it continue.

22nd June 2006 16:40  #8

filemanager Member Join Date: June 2006 Location: Canada Posts: 4
I just noticed yesterday on the South Park Season 2 DVD set (and probably other seasons, though I haven't checked) each of the discs says "Disk #" on them. Ahhh!

22nd June 2006 16:46  #9

Mal Webmaster Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 1,290
Yes, it's to do with standards and then later became a trend in the optical media industry... have a look on any CD and provided it is official then you will see Disc.

22nd June 2006 19:58  #10

Gabe Powers Editor Join Date: September 2004 Location: United States Posts: 4,457 Send a message via ICQ to Gabe Powers
I honestly didn't know there was a difference before I started working here, which leads me to believe that it's a bit of a British thing. Then anyone whose ever edited my stuff knows that I really suck at remebering such things as I write. Of course I notice when others mess stuff up though.

22nd June 2006 22:38  #11

Worst Nightmare Senior Member Join Date: July 2002 Location: Australia Posts: 6,706 Send a message via AIM to Worst Nightmare Send a message via ICQ to Worst Nightmare Send a message via MSN to Worst Nightmare Send a message via Yahoo to Worst Nightmare Send a message via Google to Worst Nightmare
You could almost compare it to a tomato - do you pronounce it as a toe-mah-toe or a toe-mae-toe, if you get my drift.

Althought I understand there is a difference in the definition of disk and disc where there isn't with a tomato.

23rd June 2006 0:32  #12

Jonny "Me You" Senior Member Join Date: March 2004 Location: Canada Posts: 2,863
Disc VS Disk
Adrian wrote:
May be a pet peeve, but you are actually technically wrong.  According to Webster's disk and disc are variants of each other that can be used interchangeably.  Very Happy


Then so many people get it wrong that the dictionary now lists it either way. Or, it could be an american thing. A lot of words like Nite or dropping u's such as in colour for color - don't actually exist in real english.

23rd June 2006 14:41  #13

Adrian Senior Member Join Date: September 2005 Location: United States Posts: 1,305
Disc VS Disk
Jonny "Me You" wrote: Then so many people get it wrong that the dictionary now lists it either way. Or, it could be an american thing. A lot of words like Nite or dropping u's such as in colour for color - don't actually exist in real english.

Real english!  ROFL!  When you become the economic super power, then you can decie what is "real english"  Very Happy  (In fact, I am a little confused that you would argue about "real english" as I would bet your English is closer to American variation than the British variety.)

An you are wrong that people misuse so it becomes acceptable.  This is just a case where there is no wrong way.  Having a strong opinion on something, does not make it the only correct way of doing things.

23rd June 2006 15:24  #14

Mal Webmaster Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 1,290
This topic isn't really about English dialects, it's more to do with standards and trademarks. For example, Blu-ray Disc is a trademarked name, you could call it Blue Ray Disk without much of a problem, but that wouldn't be the offical way to write it.

23rd June 2006 15:32  #15

Jonny "Me You" Senior Member Join Date: March 2004 Location: Canada Posts: 2,863
Disc VS Disk
Adrian wrote:
Real english!  ROFL!  When you become the economic super power, then you can decie what is "real english"  


What does economics have to do with anything? It wasn't a snarky anti-american remark, it's just fact. English comes from England. If you aren't speaking or writing it they way they do, you aren't speaking real english.

23rd June 2006 16:53  #16

Chris Gould Editor Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 7,112 Send a message via ICQ to Chris Gould Send a message via MSN to Chris Gould Send a message via Skype to Chris Gould
Disc VS Disk
Adrian wrote: Real english!  ROFL!  When you become the economic super power, then you can decie what is "real english"  Very Happy

That may have been a tongue in cheek comment, but if not it doesn't do you or your countrymen any favours. The spelling 'disc' is used because it's a trademark. Writing 'disk' when talking about DVDs is wrong because the DVD Forum says so, it's as simple as that. Having a strong opinion on something, does not make it the correct way of doing things Wink

Traditionally disc is used to refer to optical storage methods, where disk is used to refer to magnetic storage. Disc is the preferred British spelling of the word when used in an every day context.

Perhaps you'd like to read the FAQ at the DVDForum website? Not a mention of 'disk' in sight.

23rd June 2006 19:37  #17

Adrian Senior Member Join Date: September 2005 Location: United States Posts: 1,305
The fact remains that you guys are talking about preferences and calling that a standard.  There is no standard.  Both spellings derive from the word DISK which means "he seemingly flat figure of a celestial body".  Disk is actually the proper spelling of the term and disc is the less used variant.  See disk listing from Meriam-Webster.  According to that dictionary, hard disk and optical disk are both the correct way of spelling it.

Not trying to be snarky or anything, but it seems silly to me that people insist that their preference is the only right way of doing anything.

Maybe the distinction between the two terms is solely a British thing.  I can remember when magnetic media existed and even at that time the terms were used interchangeably.  The only reason to select one over the other would be for copyright/trademark reasons.  However, one company would be able to copyright the term Compact Disc and another Compact Disk because of the likelihood of confussion.  Just because a company decides on a variant spelling for financial reasons also doesn't make it right.

And Mal, I don't know about anywhere else, but Blu-Ray Disc is not a trademark in the US.

And Chris, there was a reason that there was a smiley face after that comment.  However, referring to British English as "real English" doesn't really do anyone any favors as well.  Both are recognized as dialects of the same official language.  However, of the English speakers in the world, you would be hard pressed to find ones that speak British English outside of the former colonies (excluding the US and mostly Canada as well.)

As another aside, the DVD acronym apparently has no official meaning according to Jim Taylor's DVD FAQ

23rd June 2006 19:54  #18

Mal Webmaster Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 1,290
Adrian wrote: And Mal, I don't know about anywhere else, but Blu-Ray Disc is not a trademark in the US.
Only information I have on the subject is the Blu-ray FAQ, have a look at point 1.2: http://www.blu-ray.com/faq/#bluray_name I guess it's not registered yet, got no idea since I am not an expert on the subject, just using it to give an example.

Quote: The correct full name is Blu-ray Disc, not Blu-ray Disk (incorrect spelling) The correct shortened name is Blu-ray, not Blu-Ray (incorrect capitalization) or Blue-ray (incorrect spelling) The correct abbreviation is BD, not BR or BRD (wrong abbreviation)

23rd June 2006 20:00  #19

Adrian Senior Member Join Date: September 2005 Location: United States Posts: 1,305
It could be incomplete or in process right now.  I looked at the US's patent and trademark office and the only thing that came up was a patent application for the player itself, but nothing for the term.

23rd June 2006 20:28  #20

Intergalactic Ponce Member Join Date: April 2005 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 1,151
And just because Adrian spells confusion with two S's doesn't mean it's the standard we should all be adopting. It's just his preference.Happy

24th June 2006 0:37  #21

Tigerclaw Member Join Date: November 2005 Location: Canada Posts: 493 Send a message via MSN to Tigerclaw
Bill Gates is the economic super power!

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