Leaderboard Extra
DVD terms and definitions

Forums - Discs & Movies - DVD terms and definitions 

6th March 2006 4:03  #1

Mark Lim Member Join Date: March 2004 Location: Australia Posts: 1,211
DVD terms and definitions
I found this page full of dvd terms and glossary. Very good definitions for those who have been asking what some of these mean, and their differences.

http://www.dvdtown.com/article/dvdglossary--ima...

6th March 2006 9:37  #2

Chris Gould Editor Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 7,085 Send a message via ICQ to Chris Gould Send a message via MSN to Chris Gould Send a message via Skype to Chris Gould
Our glossary is still offline (ahem, Mal) Wink

6th March 2006 9:41  #3

Chris Gould Editor Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 7,085 Send a message via ICQ to Chris Gould Send a message via MSN to Chris Gould Send a message via Skype to Chris Gould
Having just looked at that site, this is a staggering bit of misinformation:

Quote: --Modified Aspect Ratio--
Modified Aspect Ratio, or MAR, is an image shape that was created to fill a TV screen. You may have heard of terms like “full-frame” and “full-screen”, but they all mean that a movie or a TV show has been modified from what its makers wanted viewers to see. In the past, most movies with rectangular shapes had their sides chopped off to create a square image, though with the introduction of 16:9 TVs, some square-shaped movies and TV shows are having their tops and bottoms chopped off in order to create rectangular images. (Manga’s “Ninja Scroll: Special Edition” has a version of the movie, which was meant to be shown in 1.33:1, chopped at the top and bottom to “fit” 16:9 TVs as an unfortunate “extra”.)


Since when has full-frame or full screen meant the image has been modified? 4:3 pan and scan yes, but 4:3 full frame denotes an OAR transfer.

6th March 2006 14:37  #4

Adrian Senior Member Join Date: September 2005 Location: United States Posts: 1,305
Chris wrote:
Since when has full-frame or full screen meant the image has been modified? 4:3 pan and scan yes, but 4:3 full frame denotes an OAR transfer.


That last bit isn't always true Chris, at least here in the States.  Open matted films shown on DVD are also referred to as 4:3 full frame.

6th March 2006 16:56  #5

Mal Webmaster Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 1,290
Yeah sorry, will get the glossary back soon. Google even used it for their definition search so Chris and others did a good job of it.

6th March 2006 17:29  #6

Chris Gould Editor Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 7,085 Send a message via ICQ to Chris Gould Send a message via MSN to Chris Gould Send a message via Skype to Chris Gould
Adrian wrote: Chris wrote:
Since when has full-frame or full screen meant the image has been modified? 4:3 pan and scan yes, but 4:3 full frame denotes an OAR transfer.


That last bit isn't always true Chris, at least here in the States.  Open matted films shown on DVD are also referred to as 4:3 full frame.


Yeah, but they're using the term in a very loose fashion as well. DVD packaging should feature some sort of standardised labelling. A lot of the smaller distributors feature very accurate and technically correct definitions, while the bigger ones give c**p info.

Worst cases were the old Fox DVDs that claimed to be widescreen 4:3 version, or something similar. How confusing is that to most buyers?

6th March 2006 20:14  #7

Intergalactic Ponce Member Join Date: April 2005 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 1,149
For the purposes of my job, I use:-

4x3 FF (Full Frame)
4x3 1.66:1, 1.78:1, 1.85:1
4x3 Scope

16x9
16x9 Scope

It will be interesting to see, with the advent of Home HD, whether they'll continue the practise of anamorphically squeezing 1.85 and Scope films or whether the HD resolution is giong to be so much of an improvement that they won't have to bother. As they do with some types of 2k DLP projectors in Cinemas. In theory the process of anamorphically enhancing a film should disappear with HD as it was only brought about in the first place for DVD as a way of getting the maximum resolution out of the format as it was based around a 4x3 image.

Does anyone have any idea if either HD format will continue to anamorphically enhance it's content?

Quick Reply 

Message Enter the message here then press submit. The username, password and message are required. Please make the message constructive, you are fully responsible for the legality of anything you contribute. Terms & conditions apply.
Not Registered?
Forgotten Details?