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Netflix sues Blockbuster for online rentals

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Chris wrote: Yet again I'm reminded of South Park - Simpsons Already Did It.

The South Park episode that comes to my mind is the "Sexual Harrasment Panda" episode with the case "Everyone vs Everyone" LOL. I'm a blockbuster online subscriber myself, and this case is just ridiculous.
Yeah, I worked at a law firm up untill a few months ago, maybe I'm just sick of lawsuits in general.

And Walmart is the devil


Wink (sorry, I've still got a lot of left over bait)
....nobody is saying that Blockbuster, Amazon or Walmart can't set up online renting. They should just come up with their own business model rather than duplicating the essence of another enterprise. The lawsuit will probably be thrown out but I hope Blockbuster's online effort dies.
If a company spends a great deal of capital researching and testing a system that they eventually implement and it proves successful, why the f**k shouldn't they be able to protect their "intellectual property." There is a chain of hamburger restaurants in my home state of Arizona called Fuddruckers. Another company called Flakey Jakes came along and virtually duplicated every aspect of Fuddrucker's concept. Fuddruckers sued and Flakey Jakes relented. Bravo. The scum bags are the ones that steal ideas rather than developing their own. This wasn't a question of online renting... it was that Blockbuster is duplicating everything that Netfix had spent years developing. Without these protections, there is absolutely no incentive for companies to be innovative. It seems some of you feel it's O.K. to lie, cheat and steal if you wanna get ahead. And God forbid someone in business would wanna make a (dare I say it) profit!
I'm still doing pretty well with netflix, but there is a harbor in the Twin Cities, so I always get my movies within a day. It is too bad that they're becomeing just as corporate minded as Blockbuster, whom they set out to be the opposite of back when they started.
I joined Netflix in the very beginning of the company.  At the time, they were very consumer friendly.  They soon learned that being consumer friendly cost them a lot of money and they started to screw over their consumers, especially considering at the time they only had one distribution center and that was in San Francisco (a long way away from me in Florida!)  

The final straw for me was the third time they raised their rates in 2 years and then they started to charge sales tax, despite having no actual physical presense in the state of Florida.  

My complains were actually answered by the President of Netflix, but they didn't really seem concerned that they were losing customers, especially customers like me that try and get as many movies as they can through the service.  I was just part of their "churn".
The fact that they were given a patent for the way in which they run their service was ludicrous enough, and the fact that they are suing Blockbuster is just sour grapes. Netflix should just worry about not screwing over current customers.
herbe13 wrote:  Quote:  Name one other method of renting DVDs through a website? A website could allow a person to pick a new movie as soon as they return the last one. It's not as efficient, but it doesn't violate patents. If Netflix has the patent, Blockbuster should find another way to setup their rentals. It's not worth a lawsuit.

That would be completely unworkable both from a business stand point and from a consumer stand point.  After all on the business end, you aren't talking about a few customers having to choose movies, you are talking millions of customers.  Also, from a consumer standpoint would you want to have to wait by the computer for when the system tells you it has receive something so that you can get priority on what you want to view?  It just wouldn't work.

I don't even believe that Netflix "invented" this business model.  There are plenty of other sites out doing exactly the same thing, either with DVDs or with games and Netflix has not sued any of them.  Netflix has very little chance of winning this lawsuit.
Quote:  Name one other method of renting DVDs through a website? A website could allow a person to pick a new movie as soon as they return the last one. It's not as efficient, but it doesn't violate patents. If Netflix has the patent, Blockbuster should find another way to setup their rentals. It's not worth a lawsuit.
I don't think Netflicks VS BB will ever go to court.  It will be thrown out!  
herbe13 wrote: The patent is not on renting movies on line. It is the way they do it.
"The patents cover Netflix's practice of having subscribers prioritize "queues," or lists of titles they want to rent, on Netflix's Web site, and of automatically replacing each DVD that is returned for the next title on the subscriber's queue."
Sites could just find another method of renting movies.


Name one other method of renting DVDs through a website?  This idea is so simplistic and straightforward that a 4th grader could think of it.  Essentially, it is trying to monopolize online rental.  
The patent is not on renting movies on line. It is the way they do it.
"The patents cover Netflix's practice of having subscribers prioritize "queues," or lists of titles they want to rent, on Netflix's Web site, and of automatically replacing each DVD that is returned for the next title on the subscriber's queue."
Sites could just find another method of renting movies.
F**k them. F**k them all... These w**kers obviously have nothing better to do than sue one another. It's like DVD news/reviews websites suing one another over presenting similar information. No one forces you to go to 'x' site, you do so through preference...

What are Blockb*****ds gonna do next? Sue bricks and mortar stores for ripping off 'their' idea of renting 'videos'? F**king 'tards...

Yet again I'm reminded of South Park - Simpsons Already Did It.
Netflix sues Blockbuster for online rentals
I was just wondering what everyone else thought about this:

Netflix vs. Blockbuster

My immediate thought was why did they wait 18 months to sue Blockbuster and why have they not sued any of the other online rental places, like Walmart and RentMyDvd.com (which now seems to be defunct.)

I can't believe they could actually patent the business practice of renting DVDs online.  There is something really broken with the American patent system.  All online DVD rental places practically have to operate the same way.  I don't see anyway around that, so if Netflix wins that means they would have a virtual monopoly if the decline to license their patent to anyone else.