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Total Film Top Ten Influential films

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im not so sure i agree with Gladiator. I know the list had been from 97-now but i would think Braveheart would be more influential
Quote: Originally posted by Matt Joseph
But Roger and Me was released prior to 1997.
Wink


Only if you wanna get all technical. lol Tongue
I won't go into the Total Film Top 100 Movie Moments...I'll just say they were wrong.
But Roger and Me was released prior to 1997.
Wink
Quote: Originally posted by Gabriel Powers
Bowling for Columbine was influential in that it lead to an influx of popular leftest, anit-corporate documentaries. This is something totally unique to the cinema of the last 8 years. No matter what one thinks of Moore, the success of Comlumbine and 9/11 have changed popular film.


Well in all fairness I buy that line of logic, but I would suggest that Roger and Me is more influential in that regard then Columbine. It didnt make as much money but it proved the format was viable and would draw a larger niche audience later.

I also agree that lord of the rings should be there. I forget to put that in my last post. It was done right. Shot at the same time, with high quality production values all around and a sense of thankfulness on behalf of the film producers to its audience. If only all movies would be that way.
Bowling for Columbine was influential in that it lead to an influx of popular leftest, anit-corporate documentaries. This is something totally unique to the cinema of the last 8 years. No matter what one thinks of Moore, the success of Comlumbine and 9/11 have changed popular film.

I loved Magnolia and Boogie Nights, but I don't think either one had any real effect on the global cinimatic community.

I think that without Theres Something About Mary, we wouldn't have the American Pie movies (seriously, not to sound like a bastard, but why do people like these movies?)

I still say that X-men changed the way studios look at comic book properties forever.

Movies like Fight Club and Donnie Darko had an effect on select groups, but I think that popular cinema has all but ignored them. Donnie Darko flopped in theaters twice, but made a killing on DVD.

But we all seem to be in agreement that they dropped the ball with Saving Private Ryan. Maybe Brits just don't like that film.
I'm much closer to matt on this one. Bowling for Columbine? That movie was a bad joke. It actually woke me up to what a propagandist/con-artist Moore is. Apparently Canada is some haven and there are no guns here and we all leave our doors unlocked...lol

There is a gun-related murder where I live EVERYDAY and if you dont lock your doors you're just asking for trouble. At anyrate, this is about movies, not Moore.

Crouching Tiger was nothing more then a modern-looking wire-fu movie of the 60's.

Anyhow,

The Matrix
Toy Story
(2 was just a better realized version of the first)
Saving Private Ryan
Blair Witch (in the sense that it proved even a small time, do nothing movie could make a tonne of cash if properly hyped)
Gladiator
Titanic
Austin Powers (remember it flopped before video?)
American Pie (the sequels sucked)
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
There's Something About Mary
The Matrix
Toy Story 2
The Lord of the Rings Trilogy
The Blair Witch Project
Boogie Nights
Traffic
Saving Private Ryan
Donnie Darko

Take out Magnolia and replace it with the superior Paul Thomas Anderson film Boogie Nights (1997) and replace Out of Sight with another superior film from same director, Steven Soderbergh's Traffic (2000); both films are more influential in style and substance than the ones that TF chose. Any list naming the most influential films since 1997 that does not include Saving Private Ryan (1998) is illegitimate in my mind, so it gets added by default with the subtraction of Bowling for Columbine (I consider Michael Moore nothing more than a propagator of propaganda, though granted he is gifted at it). Finally, in place of Gladiator, Donnie Darko (2001), a film whose influence has slowly but surely grown since its release as a great example of a cult film and a true testament to the power of the DVD format in resuscitating films that would have been otherwise forgotten save for a handful of people.
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Magnolia didn't do it for me.
Comic book movies broke box office records, but not that influential
I'm surprise the following didn't make the cut:
Fifth Element, Titanic, Saving Private Ryan, Austin Powers, American Pie, Harry Potter.
I think those movies had some sort of influence in society.
Total Film Top Ten Influential films
I just got Total Film's 100th issue and they have a section on the top ten most influential (not best mind you, influential) films of their lifetime (1997-the present). Their list was:

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
There's Something About Mary
Bowling For Columbine
Toy Story 2
The Matrix
Magnolia
Out of Site
Gladiator
The Lord of the Rings Trilogy
and
The Blair Witch Project

Personally, no matter how much I love them as films, I can't say I find Magnolia or Out of Site all that 'influential' on mainstream filmdom. I'll admit that the rest of these, whether I like them or not (not There's Something About Mary), are influential.

Using the same rules Total Film did (ie: movies released between 1997 and the present), what do you think should've been added or subtracted from this list.

I think Saving Private Ryan changed the expectations of a war film forever Blackhawk Down, Tai Guk Gi, and even LOTR owe something to Speilberg's compositions and unflinching dipictions of violence. I think that The Phantom Menace, like it or hate it, was instrumental in the sucess of digital effects from digital characters like Gollum to entirely digitally composited films like Sky Captain and Sin City. And for good measure I'll throw in X-Men for leading to the massive onslught of comic book films that've been released in the lat 4 years. Without it we wouldn't have Spiderman 1 or 2, or Batman Begins, or a new Superman movie, or it's own sequel for that matter.