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Why Does There Have to Be a Winner? BluRay & HD

Forums - Discs & Movies - Why Does There Have to Be a Winner? BluRay & HD 

6th September 2007 11:24  #1

Director7 Member Join Date: June 2006 Location: United States Posts: 290
I've been doing a bunch of reading on other various forums seeing peoples relentless fanboyism towards one format or another, and how it's so great that Paramount is an exclusive supporter, etc... etc...

Some even made mention that Toshiba is in talks with WB to exclusively support HD-DVD (anyone else heard of this?)

I just wondered, Has it been considered that the Movie industry may be like the videogame industry; where both co-exist and have their exclusives, and there is no "winner"?

Just like Sony PS3 (Metal Gear, Gran Turismo) and Xbox 360 (Halo, Forza) co-exist and share the market, but 3rd party companies like EA, Ubisoft release games for both consoles.

So if that works, why dont Sony (with their FOX & Disney) and Toshiba (with Universal & Paramount) co-exist with their own exclusives, yet like the videogame industry, have other studios release titles that are available for both, similar to what WB is doing.

No one expects the PS3, Wii, or 360 to go away.

The gaming community understands that the consoles are the SAME DAMN THING as one another.

We could easily just have one company release all games, but we don't, we buy one console, or both, or all and go on our way.

BOTTOMLINE: I think the movie studios should consider this. I'm a HD movie enthusiast. All I want is an affordable, HD movie format.

Agree? Disagree?

6th September 2007 13:31  #2

Matt Contributor Join Date: October 2004 Location: United States Posts: 2,113
Quote: I just wondered, Has it been considered that the Movie industry may be like the videogame industry; where both co-exist and have their exclusives, and there is no "winner"?
The video game and home video markets are different paradigms, so what works for one doesn't mean it would work for the other.

6th September 2007 13:35  #3

sambadude Member Join Date: June 2006 Location: Australia Posts: 61
There have been different game platforms for many many years now whereas this type of division has never stood in the home video world. One has to win or both have to die. Thats just the way it is.

6th September 2007 18:02  #4

Chris Gould Editor Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 7,120 Send a message via ICQ to Chris Gould Send a message via MSN to Chris Gould Send a message via Skype to Chris Gould
Lame idea. With consoles you pretty much get the same releases across all the major platforms, give or take a few titles. People understand this and it plays a part in their decision to purchase (like Mario? Get Nintendo etc).

With films it's a different story. If you have one group of studios supporting one format and other studios supporting another, both exclusively, then you are going to encounter situations where people can't buy the home versions of the favourite films on their format of choice (flakey dual-format players aside). I can't see the consumer going for that, because it's just not how the home video market has been for the last twenty something years (VHS dominated until DVD arrived).

6th September 2007 22:49  #5

Director7 Member Join Date: June 2006 Location: United States Posts: 290
Matt wrote: The video game and home video markets are different paradigms, so what works for one doesn't mean it would work for the other.Fair enough, but money changes everything.


sambadude wrote: There have been different game platforms for many many years now whereas this type of division has never stood in the home video world.There's a first time for everything.


Chris Gould wrote: Lame idea.I never thought it'd be a popular idea but think about it, the scenario is happening right now.

There are 2 competing companies, with their own exclusives, there own hardware, and people are buying them each respectively.

And the main reason sales aren't where they need to be is because people don't want to buy the "losing" format. Well what if they were told there would be no loser, and that this is the way it'll be.

After some initial backlash and the adoption of HDTV's get even higher I think people would buy their preferred format (or both) based on exclusives, similar to the game industry.

Sony can NOT afford to lose since BluRay is in their PS3, Writer Drives, Blank Media and are already in the red in terms of JUST launching a console and having not made up the money since consoles aren't moving to expectations and production costs haven't lowered, not to mention price dropping the PSP and losing studio support for UMD's.

And Toshiba wont call it quits either, I'd assume they have more money to burn since manufacturing costs are lower. So Toshiba can afford to drain Sony as long as it takes, and with higher market penetration with the cheaper HD-DVD Players, combined with aquiring Paramount it doesn't look like Toshiba is going away anytime soon either.

Sony is releasing the BDP-S500 and the 2000ES Blu Ray player for $700 and $1,200. There's no way someone who's on the fence about the "Format Wars" is buying that. While Toshiba has new players starting at $299.

Just imagine your Mom or someone wanting an HD player, knowing nothing of technology, I think it's safe to assume everyones' know nothing friends/family would go for the cheaper one.

But then there are the Quality people who want the best and go for the higher end Sony's.

In the end I just don't feel like either one will give up, that both will stay, or both will go away.

6th September 2007 23:33  #6

Chris Gould Editor Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 7,120 Send a message via ICQ to Chris Gould Send a message via MSN to Chris Gould Send a message via Skype to Chris Gould
I don't agree that the reason for poor sales is because of the format war. I think it's because DVD is good enough for most people and the perceived benefits don't outweigh the cost of upgrading (that's certainly the case for me, and I edit a frikkin' DVD site). Just look at what happened with SACD and DVDA.

Doesn't all of this remind you of VHS vs. Beta though? Beta was originally the superior format and look what happened to that. Who was behind it? Sony. Do you think DVD would have been so successful if there had been two standards? Why would anyone want to own a format that only allows you to watch certain films, even if you know it's going to be around for a while? Not everyone has the money to buy two players (although this could be negated if a decent dual-format machine arrives).

You said above that the average Joe is like to opt for the cheaper product, even if it is inferior, but how then do you expect Sony's format to survive if only a small percentage of consumers (home cinema enthusiasts) are buying it?

Quote: In the end I just don't feel like either one will give up, that both will stay, or both will go away.

You should call yourself Mr. Blonde after that statement.

7th September 2007 2:53  #7

Matt Contributor Join Date: October 2004 Location: United States Posts: 2,113
Director7 wrote: Matt wrote: The video game and home video markets are different paradigms, so what works for one doesn't mean it would work for the other.Fair enough, but money changes everything.
What money? I fail to see what money has to do with this case where the two different industries are marketed completely different and both retailer business practices and consumer behavior have been well established over the course of many years.

The current state of the home video market as far as hi-def is concerned is exactly what you are suggesting, and it is a marketing failure because of the exclusivities of competing formats and a failure based on current retailer and consumer attitudes towards the home video market, which mainly consist of inventory costs and freedom of choice respectively. The problem is compounded by the fact that--like Chris said--there is always the choice of sticking with standard DVD instead of jumping into either format, and that is clearly the choice that many people are choosing. In the home video market there is only room for one hi-def format if either are to be successful, and I for one do not want hi-def on a physical medium to die off and give way to downloads which will be loaded with DRM and never actually 'owned' by any consumer who makes a purchase.

7th September 2007 3:15  #8

Director7 Member Join Date: June 2006 Location: United States Posts: 290
Chris Gould wrote: You said that the average Joe is like to opt for the cheaper product, even if it is inferior, then do you expect Sony's format to survive if only a small percentage of consumers are buying it?People dont need to necessarily buy the Sony brand player, there might be cheaper BluRay down the line appealing to the average Joe.



Director7 wrote: In the end I just don't feel like either one will give up, that both will stay, or both will go away.

Chris Gould wrote: You should call yourself Mr. Blonde after that statement.Haha, what I meant was that as hard as everyone is fighting it looks like both are here to stay. And if they both aren't staying then their both leaving.

Since DVD's are still so popular, and up-converters getting better, it's hard to tell people to spend money on a 'better' DVD player, I get that.

7th September 2007 11:54  #9

Chris Gould Editor Join Date: May 2001 Location: United Kingdom Posts: 7,120 Send a message via ICQ to Chris Gould Send a message via MSN to Chris Gould Send a message via Skype to Chris Gould
I'm glad you got that reference. I though it might be a bit obscure Wink

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