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The Day of the Jackal

(Blu-ray)
Release date: 25 September
SPECIAL EDITION CONTENTS
  • High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) presentation
  • Original uncompressed 1.0 mono audio
  • Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard-of-hearing
  • New interview with Neil Sinyard, author of Fred Zinnemann: Films of Character and Conscience
  • Two rare archival clips from the film set, including an interview with Fred Zinnemann
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Original screenplay by Kenneth Ross (BD-ROM content)
  • Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Peter Strain
  • FIRST PRESSING ONLY: Collector's booklet featuring new writing by critic Mark Cunliffe and film historian Sheldon Hall


Arrow September Releases

Quote: In 1971, Frederick Forsyth shot to bestseller status with his debut novel, The Day of the Jackal – taut, utterly plausible, almost documentarian in its realism and attention to detail. Two years later, director Fred Zinnemann ( High Noon) turned a gripping novel into a nail-biting cinematic experience.

August 1962: the latest attempt on the life of French President Charles de Gaulle by the far right paramilitary organization, the OAS, ends in chaos, with its architect-in-chief dead at the hands of a firing squad. Demoralized and on the verge of bankruptcy, the OAS leaders meet in secret to plan their next move. In a last desperate attempt to eliminate de Gaulle, they opt to employ the services of a hired assassin from outside the fold. Enter the Jackal (Edward Fox, Ghandi): charismatic, calculating, cold as ice. As the Jackal closes in on his target, a race against the clock ensues to identify and put a stop to a killer whose identity, whereabouts and modus operandi are completely unknown.

Co-starring a plethora of talent, including Michael Lonsdale ( Munich), Derek Jacobi ( The Odessa File) and Cyril Cusack ( 1984) and featuring striking cinematography by Jean Tournier ( Moonraker), The Day of the Jackal remains one of the greatest political thrillers of all time.



The Baby

(Blu-ray)
Release date: 25 September
SPECIAL EDITION CONTENTS
  • 1.85:1 and 1.33:1 versions of the feature
  • High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) presentation
  • Original uncompressed PCM mono audio
  • Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
  • Brand new audio commentary by Travis Crawford
  • Down Will Come Baby – a new retrospective with film professor Rebekah McKendry
  • Tales from the Crib – archival audio Interview with director Ted Post
  • Baby Talk – archival audio Interview with Star David Mooney
  • Theatrical Trailer
  • Reversible sleeve featuring newly commissioned artwork by The Twins of Evil
  • FIRST PRESSING ONLY: Collector’s booklet featuring new writing by Kat Ellinger


Arrow September Releases

Quote: Still traumatised by the loss of her husband, well-meaning social worker Ann Gentry (Anjanette Comer, The Loved One) throws herself into her latest assignment: the case of “Baby”, a 21-year-old man with the mind of an infant – who crawls, cries and has yet to make it out of nappies. But Baby’s family – the tyrannical “Mama” Wadsworth (Ruth Roman, Strangers on a Train) and her two demented daughters – aren’t the only ones with a warped conception of familial relations, and the full horror only begins when Ann sets her sights on liberating the drooling man-child… and in so doing unleashes the wrath of the Wadsworth women.

45 years after its original release, this film remains one of the most bizarre horror movies ever committed to celluloid. Directed by Ted Post ( Beneath the Planet of the Apes, Magnum Force) and co-starring Marianna Hill ( Messiah of Evil), The Baby is a twisted, psychedelic nightmare of suburban depravity.



The Pyjama Girl Case

(Blu-ray)
Release date: 18 September
SPECIAL EDITION CONTENTS
  • Brand new 2K restoration of the film from the original camera negative
  • High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) presentation
  • Original lossless mono Italian and English soundtracks
  • Newly translated English subtitles for the Italian soundtrack
  • Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing for the English soundtrack
  • New audio commentary by Troy Howarth, author of So Deadly, So Perverse: 50 Years of Italian Giallo Films
  • New video interview with author and critic Michael Mackenzie on the internationalism of the giallo
  • New video interview with actor Howard Ross
  • New video interview with editor Alberto Tagliavia
  • Archival interview with composer Riz Ortolani
  • Image gallery
  • Italian theatrical trailer
  • Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Chris Malbon
  • FIRST PRESSING ONLY: Collector’s booklet featuring new writing by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas


Arrow September Releases

Quote: Throughout the late 1960s and into the 70s, the Italian giallo movement transported viewers to the far corners of the globe, from swinging San Francisco to the Soviet-occupied Prague. Only one, however, brought the genre’s unique brand of bloody mayhem as far as Australia: director Flavio Mogherini (Delitto passionale)’s tragic and poetic The Pyjama Girl Case.

The body of a young woman is found on the beach, shot in the head, burned to hide her identity and dressed in distinctive yellow pyjamas. With the Sydney police stumped, former Inspector Timpson (Ray Milland, Dial M for Murder) comes out of retirement to crack the case. Treading where the “real” detectives can’t, Timpson doggedly pieces together the sad story of Dutch immigrant Glenda Blythe (Dalila Di Lazzaro, Phenomena) and the unhappy chain of events which led to her grisly demise.

Inspired by the real-life case which baffled the Australian police and continues to spark controversy and unanswered questions to this day, The Pyjama Girl Case is a uniquely haunting latter-day giallo from the tail end of the genre’s boom period, co-starring Michele Placido (director of Romanzo Criminale) and Howard Ross ( The New York Ripper), and featuring a memorably melancholic score by veteran composer Riz Ortolani ( Don’t Torture a Duckling).



Horrors of Malformed Men

(Blu-ray)
Release date: 18 September
SPECIAL EDITION CONTENTS
  • Brand new 2K restoration of the film from the original negative
  • High Definition (1080p) Blu-ray presentation
  • Uncompressed mono 1.0 PCM audio
  • Newly translated optional English subtitles
  • Two audio commentaries by Japanese cinema experts Tom Mes and Mark Schilling
  • Malformed Movies: a new video interview with Toei exploitation movie screenwriter Masahiro Kakefuda
  • Malformed Memories: Filmmakers Shinya Tsukamoto ( Tetsuo the Iron Man) and Minoru Kawasaki ( The Calamari Wrestler) on the career of director Teruo Ishii
  • Ishii in Italia: Ishii and Mark Schilling visit the Far East Film Festival
  • Image Gallery
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Dan Mumford
  • FIRST PRESSING ONLY: Collector's booklet featuring new writing by Jasper Sharp, Tom Mes and Grady Hendrix


Arrow September Releases

Quote: Cult director Teruo Ishii ( Blind Woman’s Curse) presents a nightmarish, hallucinogenic tale drawn from the fevered imagination of Japan’s celebrated pioneer ofero-guro (“erotic grotesque”) literature, Edogawa Rampo.

Medical student Hirosuke Hitomi slips out of the asylum in which he has been wrongfully confined and stealthily assumes the identity of a recently deceased nobleman with whom he bears an uncanny resemblance. Hirosuke eases his way into the nobleman’s household and his dead double’s marital bed. But as long-repressed memories begin to bubble to the surface, he soon finds himself drawn to a remote isle where he is confronted by a mad scientist and his malformed men, and discovers the key that will unlock some long-suppressed mysteries of his own.

A dark labyrinth of the monstrous and perverse that fuses mystery and horror while incorporating motifs from a myriad of Rampo's tales, Horrors of Malformed Men boasts astonishing carnivalesque art design and haunting performances. Withdrawn from cinemas by its own studio after its original scandalous release nearly fifty years ago, the film is among the very best screen interpretations of the author’s macabre brand of horror-fantasy fiction, and a unique oddity of Japanese cult cinema.









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