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The North American home video rights for all 28 original Japanese Godzilla films are spread thin all over creation. The original movie currently resides at Criterion, while a number of older ones are with Classic Media, and random stragglers are held by Kraken Releasing, Media Blasters, Echo Bridge Entertainment, and Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. This review concerns four double features Blu-rays released by Sony under the Toho Godzilla Collection banner. These eight films represent most of the post-Showa series (the first 15 movies, released from 1954 to 1975) movies currently owned by Sony. Included are five Heisei series films – Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah, Godzilla and Mothra: The Battle for Earth, Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II, and Godzilla vs. Destroyah – and three Millennium series films; Godzilla vs. Megaguirus, Godzilla: Tokyo S.O.S., and Godzilla Final Wars. Not included, but still owned by Sony, are Godzilla 2000: Millennium, Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack, and Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla – all films from the Millennium series. All films feature the superimposed English language titles, but only the ones I’ve noted below feature English opening credits.

Toho Godzilla Collection

Collection One:


Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah

(1991)
Supposedly friendly humanoids from the 23rd century have come back in time to warn mankind that a dormant Godzilla is about to reawaken and wreak havoc. The 20th century humans agree to help and head through time to kill the beast while he is still just a regular-sized dinosaur. But the mission is a ruse and the future folk have used it to trigger the rebirth King Ghidorah, an evil, flying three-headed android monster.

Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah is a follow-up to one of the best post-Showa films in the entire series, Godzilla vs. Biollante, and the second (of two) Godzilla films directed by Kazuki Omori (following Biollante). It was also sort of a third attempt to reboot the franchise after Godzilla Returns’ attempt at recreating the original film’s moody tone and Biollante’s attempt at creating a new, stand-alone threat for Big G to fight. When both options proved to be box office failures, Omori and company brought back the classic Showa monsters and the multiple foe battle formula. Like the best kaiju movies, Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah works just fine as a human-centered science fiction film first and doesn’t entirely depend on its monster fights to propel the narrative. Omori’s script recycles elements of the sci-fi-heavy Showa films and throws them in a pot with UFOs, time travelers, killer robots, a ‘manned’ half-cyborg kaiju, and a glorious scene where WWII era US forces battle a Godzillasaurus – a proto-Godzilla creature that would eventually mutate into a much larger monster following hydrogen bomb tests on its home island. Similarly convoluted plots damage other films in this collection, but Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah’s wacky excesses are consistently charming. There’s also plenty of well-executed sequences of guys in rubber suits crushing miniatures – though passing fans should note that the full-grown Ghidorah doesn’t make an appearance until about the 45-minute mark and Godzilla himself doesn’t show up for more than an hour.

* Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah features the American release opening and closing titles, including the TriStar logo.

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

Godzilla and Mothra: The Battle for Earth

(aka: Godzilla vs. Mothra, 1992)
A series of devastating earthquakes unearth a gigantic egg on the mysterious Infant Island, prompting a mismatched trio of explorers and scientists to investigate. When they arrive, they quickly discover miniature twin women, the Cosmos, who inform them that the egg contains a giant monster moth named, appropriately enough, Mothra. The humans decide to ferry the egg back to the mainland – awakening a furious Godzilla, who attacks. The egg then hatches, releasing a monster larvae. Meanwhile, an evil version of Mothra, Battra (also still in a larval form) arrives to challenge the other monsters.

After scoring a substantial hit with Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah, Toho realized that the public craved new versions of classic monsters and wasted no time putting a movie starring their second most popular kaiju, Mothra, into production. Godzilla and Mothra: The Battle for Earth picks up directly where the last story left off, but quickly establishes a new story without too many callbacks, aside from some recurring characters. Omori’s script is another mash-up of popular Showa stories, including bits of running Mothra mythology (…probably enough to fill an entire film on its own) and Hollywood clichés, including at least three scenes lifted and recreated from various Indiana Jones films and a subplot about corporate goons trying to turn a profit from Mothra and her little friends. Generally speaking, Godzilla and Mothra is a more character-driven film that exchanges sci-fi themes for fantasy elements and environmental messages. Attempts at levity are usually welcome (the intended laughs far outnumber those of its predecessor) – though broad comedy isn’t always the best idea when the audience is expected to take men in monster suits and mouse-sized fairy women seriously. The bigger failing is that Godzilla’s role here is mostly incidental. Omori handed over directing duties to Takao Okawara, who had been a second unit director on the series since The Return of Godzilla. Okawara is a slightly stronger technical director than Omori and has the advantage of working from a faster-paced (not necessarily better) story that gets to the monster action within the first half-hour. Godzilla and Mothra also scores points for making me care about Battra and Mothra’s on-screen team-up. It’s way more moving than it has any right to be.

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

Toho Godzilla Collection

Collection Two


Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II

(aka: Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla 1993)
Tired of Godzilla’s reign of terror, humanity invents Mechagodzilla – a mammoth, nuclear-powered, diamond-shielded metal robot. While construction commences, a team of scientists discover another giant egg; this time in a Rodan nest, and, because they haven’t learned anything from their previous adventures with Mothra, they bring it home for study. But the egg doesn’t house a baby Rodan – it contains a gentle baby Godzilla, whose hatching prompts a battle between the full-sized Rodan and adult Godzilla.

First-time series screenwriter Wataru Mimura’s script is a vital chapter in the ongoing Heisei series narrative. He spends the first act establishing the United Nations Godzilla Countermeasures Center (UNGCC) and their cross-continental training regiments. It’s like The Right Stuff, but with more karate classes. This institutional, worldwide effort creates a more proactive, action-based place for the humans in the Godzilla universe. Mimura also re-imagines Mechagodzilla as a tool to battle Godzilla (instead of an evil alien weapon) – introducing sentai themes to the mythology, and adding a Power Rangers flavour that is more interesting than the boring super jets that the Heisei films were otherwise obsessed with (though, of course, one of those shows up too). Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II also reintroduces fans to Rodan and a new Godzilla Jr., one with a less campy slant than the Showa series’ Manilla, who was first seen in the ultra-kid-friendly Son of Godzilla. Okawara returned as director and, armed with a more coherent script, made a tighter, more consistent film than Godzilla and Mothra. Some of the kaiju battles are sort of murky due to an excess of pyrotechnic effects, but Yoshinori Sekiguchi’s darker photography adds some mood without entirely depleting the series’ cartoonish tones. By the way, the title, Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II, is an American market creation. In Japan, the film is more appropriately known as Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla. I assume the ‘II’ was added to avoid confusion with the 1974 Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla, but the effort backfires, because the 1993 film is not a direct follow-up to the original (the situation is confused further by the existence of Terror of Mechagodzilla, a direct sequel to the 1974 movie that ended the original Showa run).

* This version of Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II appears to have the American release’s opening titles (including Tristar Logo and superimposed English titles) and the Japanese release’s end titles.

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection
 

Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla

(1994)
Following the success of Mechagodzilla, Japan’s special Counter G Bureau decides to implant Godzilla with ‘telepathic amplifier’ to control his rage. Meanwhile, the Yakuza infiltrates the Bureau to wreak havoc and cells from Godzilla’s previous battles have drifted through space to a faraway galaxy where they have mutated into SpaceGodzilla, who speeds toward Earth to battle his cellular father.

Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla is one of the messier films in the Heisei collection, but charms anyway, due to its grand ambition. It was the one and only Godzilla film directed by Kensho Yamashita, who does a fine job mimicking the house style established by Omori and Okawara. His human-scale scenes are dynamically shot and cinematographer Masahiro Kishimoto’s saturated colourful photography serves the film’s cosmic themes very well. Despite a handful of shoddy (even by Godzilla movie standards) digital effects shots, Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla is probably the most attractive entry in the Heisei series and it features the coolest creature design since Biollante (I love SpaceGodzilla’s crystal motif). The novice director is joined by first-time writers, Hiroshi Kashiwabara ( Godzilla 2000, various Lupin III TV movies) and Kanji Kashiwa. Their script incorporates many elements of the previous era movies, including the further establishment of the UNGCC and the G-Force, and reappearances by Godzilla Jr., an improved Mechagodzilla (redubbed Moguera), Mothra (in weird miniature form), and (briefly) the Cosmos. Kashiwabara and Kashiwa do not appear to have learned any lessons from Mimura’s relatively straight-forward, fat-free Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II storyline, however, and return to the overly-busy plotting of Omori’s scripts. There are definitely some neat ideas here – including the ‘Project T’ plan to hook Miki Saegusa, a recurring character with psychic connections to various kaiju, up to a ‘psychotronic’ device to control Godzilla – but the overall effect is sometimes obnoxiously unfocused. Those able to overlook the narrative issues and occasionally tone-deaf melodrama are in for a visual treat. It’s really too bad Yamashita’s career ended here, before he had more of a chance to cultivate his talents.

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

Toho Godzilla Collection

Collection Three


Godzilla vs. Destroyah

(1995)
Following his battle with SpaceGodzilla, Godzilla has become a nuclear furnace that threatens to vaporize all life on the planet. As he furiously rampages, scientists attempt to recreate the Oxygen Destroyer that stopped him back in 1994. Unfortunately, the Oxygen Destroyer has also mutated a colony of microorganisms and these new creatures, dubbed ‘Destroyah,’ are growing at an alarming rate. Godzilla is humanity’s only hope against Destroyah, but will his meltdown commence before they can find a way to stop it?

Godzilla vs. Destroyah is a fan favourite and arguably Okawara’s finest achievement as a series director. It was also the final film in the Heisei and, for a time, was intended as the ultimate Godzilla film. Omori’s script is more focused with higher stakes and plot points that tie into the original Gojira, including footage from the black & white movie, which is cleverly used to represent memories and dreams. The dour tone sometimes overwhelms the otherwise solid human drama, but a couple of well-placed jokes and a breakneck pace minimizes the damage. The action kicks off immediately with a glowing, steaming Godzilla Prime angrily kicking his way through ancient cities. He continues tantruming (with little narrative impact) while the humans struggle with the dual task of finding solutions for the Godzilla meltdown apocalypse and stemming the rise of mutating Precambrian organisms. Eventually, the kaiju stories converge and Destroyah makes it personal by nearly killing Godzilla Jr., giving Big G a good reason to beat the crap out of his enemy in one of the series’ more satisfying throw downs. The hordes of Destroyah (the most Giger-esque creatures in any Godzilla movie) and their eventual final kaiju form are reminiscent of the Gyaos creatures Gamera battled in Gamera: Guardian of the Universe, which was released earlier the same year. Both films features some surprisingly violent human vs. monster action as well. Okawara’s ‘street level’ combat scenes demonstrate his talent for more standard-sized action and even horror. Sadly, he wouldn’t revisit either skill set ever again as a director.

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection
 

Godzilla vs. Megaguirus

(2000)
In a rather creative bid to rid the world of Godzilla, scientists have developed the world’s first man-made black hole. Unfortunately, during a testing of this new Dimension Tide device, an insect is caught in the beam and mutates. It later lays giant eggs that hatch giant dragonfly monsters dubbed ‘Meganula.’ The Meganula feed on Godzilla’s nuclear energy, but cannot defeat him in an open fight, so they create a giant queen, the Megaguirus, and set the stage for an epic monster throw down.

For years, I had regarded the Millennium films as a direct, almost indiscernible extensions of the Heisei series. After watching the series back-to-back, I’m now keenly aware of how distinct the eras really are. Sure, all of the movies still operate within the same structural confines and some changes are merely aesthetic, like the Godzilla design and the updated special effects, but the sheer modernity of the Millennium series’ imagery (some of which includes ugly action close-ups and low frame-rate slow-motion) and the change in mood makes for a very different experience. Godzilla vs. Megaguirus was the first of three Godzilla movies directed by Masaaki Tezuka, who gets a little gritty with the material in a strange attempt to emulate post-millennial Hollywood action blockbusters, while still remaining true to the franchise’s man-in-suit roots. The sum effect establishes the sometimes joking/sometimes serious tone of the new series while sloshing through broad comedy, surprisingly violent horror, and straight-faced action. The previous entry, Godzilla 2000, was primed for a worldwide release and more eager to recognize the franchise’s camp appeal, but Tezuka set the stage for more serious entries. Second-time Millennium writer Hiroshi Kashiwabara and returning Heisei writer Mimura’s screenplay is incredibly uneven, especially when it sets nostalgic callbacks to the original film alongside the grimmer hardships of regular people wrapped up in the kaiju phenomenon. The usual big sci-fi idea weapons, like a black hole weapon, apply here and the heroes do fly around in a specialized jet, but humans begin taking on monsters with human-sized weapons – a tactic that became more prevalent throughout other Millennium films – especially Final Wars. The story’s biggest problem is that it is divided between an occasionally boring technical plot – the more human story of Kiriko (Misato Tanaka), a young member of the G-Graspers (similar to the G-Force) with a grudge against Big G, and clumsy side plots – most of which revolve around the evolution of Megaguirus.

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

Toho Godzilla Collection

Collection Four


Godzilla: Tokyo S.O.S.

(2003)
Mechagodzilla is undergoing repairs following a devastating battle when Mothra’s twin heralds appear to warn the scientists that their reconstruction will lead to dire consequences. Sure enough, Godzilla is awakened, attacks Tokyo, and an unfinished Mechagodzilla is put into service. Later, Mothra and her larvae join the fight.

Most of the Millennium films were standalone adventures, but Godzilla: Tokyo S.O.S. was a direct sequel of Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla – a movie Sony didn’t included in this collection. The prequel is missed, but its absence doesn’t really compound the series’ already inherent plot complications, though – especially if viewers are already familiar with the kaiju from the previous films. Returning Giant Monsters All-Out Attack writer Masahiro Yokotani and Tezuka himself (in his only credited writing gig) took over screenplay duties from Mimura, who set events in motion with Against Mechagodzilla. Like its predecessor, Tokyo S.O.S. doesn’t only recycle basic plot elements from the original films, it includes a number of references and even a few shots from the Showa era Toho films (including Godzilla movies, Mothra, and the Gargantua/Frankenstein series). The screenplay does feel repetitive and overly contemplative, but not nearly as convoluted as some of the drier Heisei entries. Tezuka also returned to direct both Against Mechagodzilla and Tokyo S.O.S., after handing the reins over to Gamera: Guardian of the Universe and Death Note director Shusuke Kaneko for Giant Monsters All-Out Attack. With the practice run of Megaguirus out of the way, he polished up the rough patches between the more modern-looking action scenes (including low-angle camera shots in place of sloppy close-ups and speedier editing without choppy slo-mo) and the naturalistic, charmingly corny character moments. The pacing is still too leisurely (what little plot wasn’t set in the previous movie probably shouldn’t take half an hour to establish), but the tonal shifts don’t buck up against each other as awkwardly, allowing audiences to enjoy the serious tone without missing out on all the cheesy goodness they expect from the franchise.

* Tokyo S.O.S. features the TriStar logo and a superimposed English title at the beginning of the film, but also includes the original Japanese post-credit gag. Also note that Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla is available to stream on Crackle.com in HD, though you will have to endure a lot of commercials.

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

Godzilla: Final Wars

(2004)
Long ago, Godzilla was successfully buried deep beneath the ice in the South Pole, never to be heard from again. Then, after years of peace, other kaiju return to wreak havoc on cities worldwide. When all seems lost, a massive U.F.O. suddenly appears and neutralizes all the monsters with a mysterious laser beam. The aliens, dubbed ‘Xiliens,’ announce that they have come in peace, but it isn’t long before their insidious plans to conquer the planet are revealed. Unable to battle the Xiliens’ legions of kaiju, Earth forces begrudgingly free Godzilla from his icy prison in hopes that he will take care of the problem for them.

I understand the mixed responses towards Godzilla: Final Wars. It takes an awful lot of liberties with the material and, despite being counted as part of the Millennium series, it is a stand-alone culmination of everything Ryuhei Kitamura liked about the entire franchise. It’s less of a movie and more of a junk food buffet. But I still adore it more than any other movie in this eight film collection. Some readers will see this as an indictment of opinions on everything Godzilla (the only franchise movies higher on my favourite list are the original and the uber-weird Godzilla vs. Hedorah) and I’m afraid I can’t blame them. Part of the issue is that the Godzilla movies have long been stylistically standardized affairs. Once a series was established, the filmmakers tended to stick to a template. Kitamura was hired to bring his distinctive style to a greatest hits package and, as a result, Final Wars is an indubitably Kitamura-esque motion picture, brimming with the hyperactive, live-action anime styling he had been cultivating since Versus (not to mention a number of Matrix and Star Wars references). The film’s story was prepped by Mimura and producer Shogo Tomiyama, but the actual script was put together by Kitamura and his long-time writing partner, Shogo Tomiyama, ensuring the greatest portions of short attention span antics and cultural satire was tossed into the pot. Does the film over-indulge in action movie excess and lose sight of what fans specifically enjoy about these films, namely monsters fighting other monsters? Probably, but it’s very entertaining and really not all that more ridiculous than the other Millennium era entries.

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

 Toho Godzilla Collection

Video


When Sony first announced they were releasing an assortment of Godzilla features, many assumed/feared that they’d simply dump their catalogue titles in hopes of making a quick buck from the excitement surrounding the new reboot. Even the ‘Remastered in High Definition’ banners on the covers of the Blu-rays didn’t convince fans – especially those burned by Mill Creek’s habit of cramming multiple kaiju movies onto single disc ‘collections.’ Well, first things first – each of the four Toho Godzilla Collection double features include two discs, giving each movie room to breathe. Still, even the larger file sizes aren’t proof that Sony isn’t re-using uncompressed versions of the same ‘eh’ transfers that appeared on their anamorphic DVDs. The final results are hit and miss from film to film and even scene to scene. Sometimes, I was willing to believe the claims that Toho had supplied Sony with remastered transfers, but was never fully convinced I wasn’t watching a higher bit-rate version of an older release (for the record, the transfer more or less match their HD counterparts on Crackle, minus the digital streaming compression issues).

The Heisei movies are all 1.85:1 and are weaker, due to their advanced age. The grain structure is clumpier and less consistent, details are softer, and the neutral colours tend to be a bit muddy (the yellows and greens of both films tend to merge into soup on parts of Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah and Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II). Still, highlight hues, like hideous, pastel-coloured early ‘90s garments, and the more vivid special effects, are plenty vibrant and the series’ cinematographers tended to shoot using soft focus, both for stylish reasons and to cover the limitations of the effects. The darker scenes tend to be sharper, as do the more heavily contrasted kaiju fights. Some of the discs, Godzilla and Mothra and Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla for example, are sharper and higher contrast in general, leading to a mixed bag of minor edge haloes and better colour differentiation – though both discs are also considerably more vivid ( Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla is probably the collection’s Heisei high watermark). The prints are largely cleansed of film-based artefacts (aside from the occasionally clumping grain), but do pop up on some of the transfers, especially Godzilla vs. Destroyah, which includes a handful of water spots and tracking lines.

The Millennium films (at least the ones included here) were shot in scope, 2.40:1 widescreen, and have been better maintained. All three feature that slightly soft, digitally graded look shared by many other Japanese films from the early ‘00s. Godzilla vs. Megaguirus has a greenish tint and amplified, orangish skin tones. The saturated quality of other warm hues cause blooming effects when put up against diffused highlights. Crushed blacks help establish crisp details, but sudden uptakes in grain and anamorphic lens effects don’t do wide-angle textures any favours. Tokyo S.O.S looks similar in terms of detail and texture, but is slightly cleaner overall (there are still a number of scenes overrun with grain), partially because it uses crisper photography and fewer diffused lighting techniques. The kaiju fights are also notably sharper than the less elaborate, human-centric moments. Final Wars was shot using Sony HDW-F900 digital cameras and is the most consistent looking transfer in the collection. It’s still underwhelming, but many of its shortcomings can probably be blamed on the limitations of the 1080 F900 system, which suffers more noise and compression artefacts than newer, 4K cameras. I’ve never actually seen the film in HD and was taken aback by the prevalent digital grit and soft details, especially during the human interaction scenes. Colour quality is vivid (the palette changes, depending on location) and well-separated, however, and the brighter-lit, special effects-heavy scenes are effectively dynamic.

Audio


Another negative assumption that follows Sony’s stateside Kaiju releases is that they won’t include the original Japanese audio tracks. Again, the studio defied expectations by not only including the Japanese dialogue, but presenting it in lossless DTS-HD Master Audio to boot. In most cases, both the Japanese tracks and English dubs have not been remixed and are presented as they were in theaters. Both Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah and Godzilla and Mothra feature 2.0 stereo Japanese tracks and mono English dubs, Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II has a 5.1 Japanese and stereo English tracks, Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla and Godzilla vs. Destroyah has 5.1 Japanese and English remix tracks. All three Millennium films are presented in their original 5.1 mixes.

The Japanese tracks are stronger in every case. The earlier films have surprising depth and clarity when it comes to elemental separation. The dialogue tracks are natural and pretty consistent, even when characters are forced to shout over screaming monsters. The sci-fi sounds of laser beams, spaceships, and time travel are always highlights, as are the scenes featuring the loudest explosions and creature roars. The 5.1 remixes have their share of rear channel interactions (such as anti-kaiju weaponry firing from off-screen via the back speakers), but are generally very close to their stereo surround counterparts. The original 5.1 tracks that accompany the Millennium films are more aggressive and immersive; though, like early Hollywood digital surround tracks, they aren’t as well layered as more modern features. The directional enhancements tend to be more blunt and aggressive, while dialogue-heavy scenes remain relatively free of ambient noise. Final Wars’ soundtrack is the most aggressive one, including a number of cartoonish effects embellishments, more explosive battles, and busier ambient environments. The dubbing during the English scenes is still ridiculously bad, of course (especially a bit where a New York cop clearly mouths an f-bomb).

Original Gojira composer Akira Ifukube scored most of the pre-Millennial films and his music sounds much better on the Japanese tracks, where the stereo spread allows for more intricate instrumentations. Takayuki Hattori’s Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla score follows suit, including a number of new cues and a generally louder sound quality (specifically on the Japanese track). Kow Otani ( Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack) and Michiru Oshima’s ( Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla and Godzilla: Tokyo S.O.S.) more modern, but still largely symphonic soundtracks have heavier bass and wider scope than the Heisei scores. The Final Wars music is a completely different animal – a mash-up of Ifukube’s original themes, new music from Keith Emerson (yes, of Emerson, Lake & Palmer), and techno additions from Kitamura regulars Nobuhiko Morino & Daisuke Yano. The electronic cues are relentless.

Normally, I’m a vocal member of ‘Team Original Language Tracks,’ but, in the case of a kaiju movie, I find it hard to discourage anyone from enjoying the extra cheddar of an English dub. On the other hand, most of these dubs are simply too roughly mixed to recommend them over the original tracks. The Heisei movies in particular suffer tinny effects and flat vocals that overrun the music with significantly higher volume levels. Some of the English subtitles do appear to be of the ‘dubtitle’ variety, including certain kaiju being referred to by their Anglicized names, rather than their original Japanese titles.

Extras


The first six discs in the series feature only teasers and trailers (many of which end with news that the people that get the theater early will get awesome toys and collectibles). Tokyo S.O.S. includes a decent behind-the-scenes EPK, (21:50, SD) and a trailer. Godzilla Final Wars includes Godzilla: B-Roll to Film featurette (17:50, SD) and more trailers.

Overall


I assume fans will be disappointed by the lack of certain films in these Blu-ray double feature collections, especially Godzilla against Mechagodzilla and Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack. I’m not nearly as impressed with these remastered transfers as I’d like to be, either. Still, the DTS-HD MA soundtracks are very good and I’m pretty sure we’re never going to see super-clear versions of these films anytime soon. I guess I’m torn and am left hesitantly recommending these collections, assuming the price is right.

* Note: The above images are taken from the Blu-ray and resized for the page. Full-resolution captures are available by clicking individual images, but due to .jpg compression they are not necessarily representative of the quality of the transfer. I had trouble getting captures from Godzilla vs King Ghidorah, Tokyo S.O.S., and Godzilla: Final Wars, so caps for those three may appear more compressed when viewed in full resolution.


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